Currently Reading

The Count of Monte Cristo

GOODREADS SYNOPSIS: ‘On what slender threads do life and fortune hang.’

Thrown in prison for a crime he has not committed, Edmond Dantès is confined to the grim fortress of If. There he learns of a great hoard of treasure hidden on the Isle of Monte Cristo and he becomes determined not only to escape, but also to unearth the treasure and use it to plot the destruction of the three men responsible for his incarceration.

Dumas’ epic tale of suffering and retribution, inspired by a real-life case of wrongful imprisonment, was a huge popular success when it was first serialised in the 1840s.

Robin Buss’ lively translation is complete and unabridged, and remains faithful to the style of Dumas’ original.


My husband has been nagging me to read this book for over a year so we can watch the movie together. He has already seen the movie but wants me to watch it and I want to read the novel before watching the movie, so I am giving in and will read this novel.

Wish me luck, hopefully I can get through it!

❤ MeLzY

[Book Review]: Boy from the bush – Lee Kernaghan

Boy From The Bush: The Songs And The StoriesGOODREADS SYNOPSIS: Lee Kernaghan’s very outback memoir is an affectionate celebration of the sounds, characters and milestones (as well as the odd calamity) behind the making of an Australian music legend.

Lee Kernaghan is ‘the Boy From the Bush’, an iconic star and 2008 Australian of the Year whose music has shaped a generation of country music fans. For the first time, Lee steps off the stage and invites you behind the scenes, into the ute and over the rutted red dirt on a rollocking journey through his songs and the stories that inspired them.
In a plot with more twists than the Gwydir River, Lee bounces from a disastrous caravan-obliterating encounter on Nine Mile Hill to the triumph of the Starmaker stage, from his infamous teenage rock’n’roll-fuelled Albury High lunchtime music room invasion to the frenzy of the Deniliquin Ute Muster. He shares the doubts that nearly ended his career before it began, the heartache of the bush in crisis and reveals the secrets behind scores of his hit songs. It’s a tapestry of yarns that will fascinate, amuse and entertain diehard fan and newcomer alike.

She’s My Ute, the Outback Club, Hat town, Planet Country – Lee’s hits have earned him 33 Golden Guitars and 3 ARIA Awards, climbed to the top of the Aussie charts 32 times and propelled over 2 million albums off the shelves and into the lives of everyday Australians. Now the songs that celebrate the life and times of our rural heart take on a whole new dimension as Lee draws us into his confidence, into the studio, onto the tour bus and up the hill to his hidden songwriting shack, along the way initiating readers into fully-fledged membership of the Outback Club.

A unique memoir for everyone, Lee Kernaghan’s Boy from the Bush is an affectionate, inspiring and unforgettable montage of characters, conquests and calamities that tumble from the real-life adventures of an Australian legend.


The synopsis pretty much explains a lot about this novel. It took me a while to get into reading this book because it’s a biography and I don’t really read biographies. But once I buckled down and started reading more, it got more interesting the more I read and then didn’t take me too long to finish it at all.

I love Lee Kernaghan (hence the reason I bought this book in the first place), so to read the inspirations behind every song he’s written is quite interesting.

Some stories are sad while other’s are funny, but unless you love country music and more importantly, Lee Kernaghan and his music, then I don’t think you’ll enjoy this book.

❤ MeLzY

5 days in the South Coast of NSW

Having recently bought ourselves a caravan to do even more travelling then we already do, we decided to give it it’s first real test with a 5 day trip down the South Coast.

First we stayed at Lake Tabourie Holiday Park for 2 nights, which was situated right on the lake, with walking access to Wairo beach. It was a beautiful place to stay.

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We rode our bikes along the hard sand which was a little harder than anticipated at times, but we had fun doing it.

Whilst staying in Lake Tabourie, we spent a day in the town of Ulladullah which was only a 10 minute drive away and then drove to verious places to take in some beautiful views.

Burrill Beach

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Mollymook Beach

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Ulladullah Lighthouse/ Gari Bagan Walk

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After spending 2 nights in Lake Tabourie, we drove a little further South and stayed 3 nights at Batemans Bay Easts Riverside Holiday Park and this park, like the last one was too situated on the water, but this time we could actually see it. It was a beautiful, relaxing atmosphere to camp along the water.

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Our view from our caravan
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The beautiful sunset from our caravan

Whilst staying in Batemans Bay, we did more sightseeing around the area and found these nice little towns with beautiful views.

Burrewarra Point

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Tuross Head

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One Tree Point

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Bodalla

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Bingi Bingi

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Part of a shipwreck

Duesbury Beach

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Narooma

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Australia Rock

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Mystery Bay

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Tilba Tilba

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Although we had already been to these areas previously, we still managed to find places we had missed the first time around and those that we saw again, we found them just as enjoyable as the first time.

So the caravan did it’s job well and we are already planning our next big caravan trip to the Mornington Penninsula, so stay tuned for that post!

❤ MeLzY

 

 

 

Currently Reading

Boy From The Bush: The Songs And The Stories

Lee Kernaghan – Boy from the Bush

GOODREADS SYNOPSIS: Lee Kernaghan’s very outback memoir is an affectionate celebration of the sounds, characters and milestones (as well as the odd calamity) behind the making of an Australian music legend.

Lee Kernaghan is ‘the Boy From the Bush’, an iconic star and 2008 Australian of the Year whose music has shaped a generation of country music fans. For the first time, Lee steps off the stage and invites you behind the scenes, into the ute and over the rutted red dirt on a rollocking journey through his songs and the stories that inspired them.
In a plot with more twists than the Gwydir River, Lee bounces from a disastrous caravan-obliterating encounter on Nine Mile Hill to the triumph of the Starmaker stage, from his infamous teenage rock’n’roll-fuelled Albury High lunchtime music room invasion to the frenzy of the Deniliquin Ute Muster. He shares the doubts that nearly ended his career before it began, the heartache of the bush in crisis and reveals the secrets behind scores of his hit songs. It’s a tapestry of yarns that will fascinate, amuse and entertain diehard fan and newcomer alike.

She’s My Ute, the Outback Club, Hat town, Planet Country – Lee’s hits have earned him 33 Golden Guitars and 3 ARIA Awards, climbed to the top of the Aussie charts 32 times and propelled over 2 million albums off the shelves and into the lives of everyday Australians. Now the songs that celebrate the life and times of our rural heart take on a whole new dimension as Lee draws us into his confidence, into the studio, onto the tour bus and up the hill to his hidden songwriting shack, along the way initiating readers into fully-fledged membership of the Outback Club.

A unique memoir for everyone, Lee Kernaghan’s Boy from the Bush is an affectionate, inspiring and unforgettable montage of characters, conquests and calamities that tumble from the real-life adventures of an Australian legend.

[Book Review]: Th1rteen R3asons Why – Jay Asher

Thirteen Reasons WhyGOODREADS SYNOPSIS: You can’t stop the future.
You can’t rewind the past.
The only way to learn the secret . . . is to press play.

Clay Jensen returns home from school to find a strange package with his name on it lying on his porch. Inside he discovers several cassette tapes recorded by Hannah Baker–his classmate and crush–who committed suicide two weeks earlier. Hannah’s voice tells him that there are thirteen reasons why she decided to end her life. Clay is one of them. If he listens, he’ll find out why.

Clay spends the night crisscrossing his town with Hannah as his guide. He becomes a firsthand witness to Hannah’s pain, and as he follows Hannah’s recorded words throughout his town, what he discovers changes his life forever.


I am a little confused about whether I liked this novel or not.

The one thing that really annoyed me from start to finish was the fact that it was written in two simultaneous narratives. I was getting confused whilst reading it, forgetting who was saying what. And the fact that there are so many character’s in this story, made it all the more confusing aswell because I had to keep remembering who was who before I could read on.

Books like this, although it was an interesting read, I don’t quite enjoy reading them.

I found this book to be aimed more for adolescents rather than adults, it’s just a vibe I got while reading it, I’m not sure if it’s because the novel is all about teenagers at high school, although I’m sure that is the reason. It reminded me of John Green’s novels and Gayle Foreman novel’s, just not as good.

I am now watching the Netflix mini serious adaptation of this novel, and although I am only 2 episodes in so far, I have already noticed that the series may be a little better than the novel (odd for me to say – I know!) but the series is taking the story further than what the book did, it’s adding to each tape. But then again, I guess they have to otherwise the series will be very short.

The actor’s chosen to portray the character’s were not at all how I imagined them whilst reading the book, which threw me a bit but I guess you get passed that pretty quickly.

And lastly, let’s talk about the actual story – I’m not sure writing a book aimed at adolescents should be about teenage suicide. In no way did this author say at any time throughout the novel that help is always around the corner, instead he made Hannah seek help from her guidance counsellor and other school friends (in a roundabout way) but never find the right answer from them for her to change her mind, so in turn he’s actually telling his reader’s that if people don’t say what you want them to say in order for you to change your mind, than it’s ok to go ahead with it because you tried to get help but it didn’t work.

I know it’s just a novel and it’s fiction but this particular story might aswell be non fiction because so many people go through this during their adolescents and this book is a source of encouragement for suicide.

All in all, it was a good read but not my favourite.

Have you read this novel or seen this series? What did you think of it?

❤ MeLzY

 

[Book Review]: What Alice forgot – Liane Moriarty

What Alice ForgotGOODREADS SYNOPSIS: Alice Love is twenty-nine, crazy about her husband, and pregnant with her first child.

So imagine Alice’s surprise when she comes to on the floor of a gym and is whisked off to the hospital where she discovers the honeymoon is truly over — she’s getting divorced, she has three kids and she’s actually 39 years old. Alice must reconstruct the events of a lost decade, and find out whether it’s possible to reconstruct her life at the same time. She has to figure out why her sister hardly talks to her, and how is it that she’s become one of those super skinny moms with really expensive clothes.

Ultimately, Alice must discover whether forgetting is a blessing or a curse, and whether it’s possible to start over.


What Alice forgot is a great, easy, quick read with character’s a lot of people can probably relate to in some way or another.

Liane Moriarty is quickly becoming one of my favourite authors. This is the 4th book of her’s that I’ve read now and I really enjoyed it. She is a great Australian writer.

While reading this book it makes you put yourself in Alice’s position and think about what you could potentially forget if you fell and lost the last 10 years of your life. I know I wouldn’t forget all that much because not much has happened for me in the last 10 years but it would still be a shock to wake up thinking your in a completely different decade to what you’re meant to be in.

I did start reading this book on an aeroplane and couldn’t seem to get into it very much. It seemed to start off a bit weird and slow and it just didn’t give me the connection with the story straight away to want to continue reading it, so I left it for a week or so and then decided to continue, which I’m glad I did, because I did quickly become engrossed with the story and wanted to keep reading to unravel all of Alice’s past once they started to slowly come back to her.

It’s amazing how much we can all change in a decade, not just by our appearance, but our personalities aswell. Alice didn’t recognise who she had become and also didn’t like who she had become, and that’s a sad thought. I wonder if we all took the time now to think back to 2007 – have you changed? How much have you changed? Most importantly, are you happy with who you’ve become?

It’s a book that makes you reflect on yourself and put things into perspective and I believe it will be turned into a movie which is due to hit cinema’s sometime this year. I’m not sure how well it will do as a movie, but the book was is a great read.

Have you read this book? What did you think of it?

❤ MeLzY

Currently Reading

What Alice Forgot

 What Alice Forgot by Liane Moriarty

GOODREADS SYNOPSIS:

Alice Love is twenty-nine, crazy about her husband, and pregnant with her first child.

So imagine Alice’s surprise when she comes to on the floor of a gym and is whisked off to the hospital where she discovers the honeymoon is truly over — she’s getting divorced, she has three kids and she’s actually 39 years old. Alice must reconstruct the events of a lost decade, and find out whether it’s possible to reconstruct her life at the same time. She has to figure out why her sister hardly talks to her, and how is it that she’s become one of those super skinny moms with really expensive clothes.

Ultimately, Alice must discover whether forgetting is a blessing or a curse, and whether it’s possible to start over.


Come back soon for my thoughts and full review of this book!

❤ MeLzY