Our Victorian Journey – Stop 3: The Mornington Peninsula

So I guess if you’ve read the title of this post you will have figured out that Hubby decided he was OK enough to continue on with our Victorian trip and so we finally made it to the Mornington Peninsula.

But before we left the Yarra Valley we couldn’t go without first visiting the Yarra Valley Chocolaterie & ice creamery!

The views outside were stunning enough but inside was just heaven!

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So having had our chocolate fix, we were ready for the long drive to Frankston, where we stayed for the next 5 nights which made it easier for us not having to move the caravan too much.

Our jam packed itinerary had to be amended to suit Hubby, so all the cycling tracks got scrapped, as did most of the bush walking tracks. We stuck to drives and small walks. It wasn’t what we had planned but we made the most of it while we were there and still did and saw a lot.

Frankston was a lovely place to stay. It had a great esplanade boardwalk and a long jetty which we strolled one morning.

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It also had lots of little sculptures scattered around, which was fun to see.

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We continued to drive along the peninsula to Mornington where we saw all the awesome coloured beach huts.

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These beach huts are famous throughout the Mornington Peninsula and they are found on every beach. They are so fun to see with all there different colours and patterns.

We stopped in at Benton Rise Farm, which is a fruit & veg market in an old rattler train. Unfortunately it was closed the day we went but it was interesting to see either way.

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Another stop we made was at Arthur’s Seat for the Arthur’s Seat Eagle which showed us views of the whole peninsula beneath us. It was spectacular and relaxing.

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After Arthur’s Seat Eagle we stopped at Main Ridge Dairy for some yum goats cheese.

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We had a cheese tasting plate and they were all so great it was hard to choose a favourite.

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As I’ve mentioned before, we love our cheese and prefer to do cheese tastings then wine tastings and so of course we hadn’t had enough of cheese after this plate, we then went to Red Hill cheese for another tasting plate.

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Unfortunately this tasting plate was not nearly as good as the first one, but we really enjoyed the experience of it.

So by then we figured we could do a little walking and so we went to Montalto Vineyard & Sculpture park. We walked through their beautifully manicured gardens set amongst the vineyards and viewed their wonderful sculptures. It is something we had never seen before, which made the experience all the more enjoyable.

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We then walked inside the vineyard restaurant and had a taste of some cider and different kinds of oils. A place we highly recommend.

Another stop we made was in Sorrento for the Millionaires Walk. This was an interesting/ strange walk as we were literally walking along a cliff in peoples backyards, looking below on their private jettys.

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During our stay in Frankston, we took a day to drive to the CBD considering it was only about an hour away and had an enjoyable day in the city.
Before returning to Frankston, we drove to the cold-e-sac where the TV show Neighbours is filmed and it was so great seeing the houses up close in person.

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Our final day in the Peninsula was a nice one. We started the day at the Peninsula Hot Springs which was just so relaxing and a wonderful experience. It consisted of about 20-25 different hot baths with varying temperatures. Some went as high as 50 degrees!

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Having relaxed in the hot baths for a few hours, we then drove to Cape Schanck for some scenic walking tracks.

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Pulpit Rock

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The blowhole

From Frankston we had originally planned to continue on to the other side to the Bellarine Peninsula and then onto the Great Ocean Road but considering we had already done the Great Ocean Road before, we decided to cut the trip short and go straight home so Hubby can rest and recover properly.

 

Our Victorian Journey – Stop 2: The Yarra Valley

The Yarra Valley is another place I’ve always wanted to visit. Hubby and I aren’t really wine drinkers but we love seeing the rolling vineyards and the Yarra Valley didn’t disappoint in that area.

We visited Napoleone Brewery & Ciderhouse (because we like a bit of cider) and it was just the most gorgeous place. One of the nicest vineyards we’ve ever visited.

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We bought a tasting paddle with 4 different ciders on it – it was quite the experience as we had never done this before.

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So after we got a little wobbly (yes, it doesn’t take much), we went down the road to Yarra Valley Dairy for some cheese tastings, which we can never pass up.

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The cheese was just delightful and of course we couldn’t leave without buying some yummy feta (our favourite cheese!)

Our next stop whilst staying in the Yarra Valley was the Dandenong Ranges.

The drive was quite windy but also very beautiful, lined either side with hundreds of palms and ferns.

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We stopped at Sky High to see the view as we had climbed a fair bit by then and we could just see Melbourne CBD because it was still quite early and foggy.

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From there we drove to Olinda Falls to see some waterfalls. It wasn’t a very long walk from the car park, which is always better.

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The upper falls
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The lower falls

So this is where our trip got a little tricky. Hubby decided to go where you’re not really meant to just to get a better photo and of course he slipped on a wet log and fell on his ribs. So the rest of this day was mainly spent in some unknown hospital in the middle of nowhere.
After waiting half the afternoon for the results, he finally got the all clear and we were back on the road. But unfortunately it wasn’t so fun anymore because he was in quite a lot of pain which made the trip hard for us to enjoy from that point on.

From the hospital we drove to see the famous Puffing Billy steam train but of course missed it by a couple of minutes because Hubby couldn’t walk very fast. It seemed the day had turned against us and so we headed back to the caravan park.

Whether to continue on with our trip or not was now in the hands of Hubby and how he felt the next morning.

Stay tuned to find out whether our trip continued or not.

❤ MeLzY

 

 

Our Victorian Journey – Stop 1: Mansfield

Our main destination for our Victorian trip was the Mornington Peninsula. It looked absolutely beautiful in the tourist books and online and I couldn’t wait to get there. I researched everything and everywhere about the peninsula and had a nice long itinerary ready to go.

We decided it was a long way to go just for the Peninsula and so we decided to add a few stops before and after it and extend the trip a little longer to about 2-3 weeks.

So our first stop was Mansfield. A nice small quaint little country town but also the town to go to if you want to get to the famous Craigs Hut (from the Man from Snowy River movie). Also the town to go to for the snow season at Mt Buller.

Craigs Hut is the sole reason we stopped at Mansfield. We have been wanting to see this historic place for a decade and never thought we would get there, but after a very long and windy dirt track – we finally made it!

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We took the same shot of the famous Ken Duncan photo
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Inside the famous hut

It was just so unbelievable to me that we were actually standing there. The views were breathtaking, which made the drive up so worth it.

While in Mansfield we drove up to Mt Buller snowfields. There wasn’t any snow yet (we were 1 week early), but the views were amazing.

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Mt Buller is like it’s own little village up in the mountains.

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All in all, Mansfield was a great 1 night stop over, worth it if only to see Craigs Hut because there isn’t really much else to see and do there, but the area is quiet and relaxing aswell.

Stay tuned for stop 2.

❤ MeLzY

 

Currently Reading

The Count of Monte Cristo

GOODREADS SYNOPSIS: ‘On what slender threads do life and fortune hang.’

Thrown in prison for a crime he has not committed, Edmond Dantès is confined to the grim fortress of If. There he learns of a great hoard of treasure hidden on the Isle of Monte Cristo and he becomes determined not only to escape, but also to unearth the treasure and use it to plot the destruction of the three men responsible for his incarceration.

Dumas’ epic tale of suffering and retribution, inspired by a real-life case of wrongful imprisonment, was a huge popular success when it was first serialised in the 1840s.

Robin Buss’ lively translation is complete and unabridged, and remains faithful to the style of Dumas’ original.


My husband has been nagging me to read this book for over a year so we can watch the movie together. He has already seen the movie but wants me to watch it and I want to read the novel before watching the movie, so I am giving in and will read this novel.

Wish me luck, hopefully I can get through it!

❤ MeLzY

[Book Review]: Boy from the bush – Lee Kernaghan

Boy From The Bush: The Songs And The StoriesGOODREADS SYNOPSIS: Lee Kernaghan’s very outback memoir is an affectionate celebration of the sounds, characters and milestones (as well as the odd calamity) behind the making of an Australian music legend.

Lee Kernaghan is ‘the Boy From the Bush’, an iconic star and 2008 Australian of the Year whose music has shaped a generation of country music fans. For the first time, Lee steps off the stage and invites you behind the scenes, into the ute and over the rutted red dirt on a rollocking journey through his songs and the stories that inspired them.
In a plot with more twists than the Gwydir River, Lee bounces from a disastrous caravan-obliterating encounter on Nine Mile Hill to the triumph of the Starmaker stage, from his infamous teenage rock’n’roll-fuelled Albury High lunchtime music room invasion to the frenzy of the Deniliquin Ute Muster. He shares the doubts that nearly ended his career before it began, the heartache of the bush in crisis and reveals the secrets behind scores of his hit songs. It’s a tapestry of yarns that will fascinate, amuse and entertain diehard fan and newcomer alike.

She’s My Ute, the Outback Club, Hat town, Planet Country – Lee’s hits have earned him 33 Golden Guitars and 3 ARIA Awards, climbed to the top of the Aussie charts 32 times and propelled over 2 million albums off the shelves and into the lives of everyday Australians. Now the songs that celebrate the life and times of our rural heart take on a whole new dimension as Lee draws us into his confidence, into the studio, onto the tour bus and up the hill to his hidden songwriting shack, along the way initiating readers into fully-fledged membership of the Outback Club.

A unique memoir for everyone, Lee Kernaghan’s Boy from the Bush is an affectionate, inspiring and unforgettable montage of characters, conquests and calamities that tumble from the real-life adventures of an Australian legend.


The synopsis pretty much explains a lot about this novel. It took me a while to get into reading this book because it’s a biography and I don’t really read biographies. But once I buckled down and started reading more, it got more interesting the more I read and then didn’t take me too long to finish it at all.

I love Lee Kernaghan (hence the reason I bought this book in the first place), so to read the inspirations behind every song he’s written is quite interesting.

Some stories are sad while other’s are funny, but unless you love country music and more importantly, Lee Kernaghan and his music, then I don’t think you’ll enjoy this book.

❤ MeLzY

5 days in the South Coast of NSW

Having recently bought ourselves a caravan to do even more travelling then we already do, we decided to give it it’s first real test with a 5 day trip down the South Coast.

First we stayed at Lake Tabourie Holiday Park for 2 nights, which was situated right on the lake, with walking access to Wairo beach. It was a beautiful place to stay.

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We rode our bikes along the hard sand which was a little harder than anticipated at times, but we had fun doing it.

Whilst staying in Lake Tabourie, we spent a day in the town of Ulladullah which was only a 10 minute drive away and then drove to verious places to take in some beautiful views.

Burrill Beach

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Mollymook Beach

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Ulladullah Lighthouse/ Gari Bagan Walk

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After spending 2 nights in Lake Tabourie, we drove a little further South and stayed 3 nights at Batemans Bay Easts Riverside Holiday Park and this park, like the last one was too situated on the water, but this time we could actually see it. It was a beautiful, relaxing atmosphere to camp along the water.

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Our view from our caravan
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The beautiful sunset from our caravan

Whilst staying in Batemans Bay, we did more sightseeing around the area and found these nice little towns with beautiful views.

Burrewarra Point

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Tuross Head

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One Tree Point

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Bodalla

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Bingi Bingi

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Part of a shipwreck

Duesbury Beach

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Narooma

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Australia Rock

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Mystery Bay

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Tilba Tilba

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Although we had already been to these areas previously, we still managed to find places we had missed the first time around and those that we saw again, we found them just as enjoyable as the first time.

So the caravan did it’s job well and we are already planning our next big caravan trip to the Mornington Penninsula, so stay tuned for that post!

❤ MeLzY

 

 

 

Currently Reading

Boy From The Bush: The Songs And The Stories

Lee Kernaghan – Boy from the Bush

GOODREADS SYNOPSIS: Lee Kernaghan’s very outback memoir is an affectionate celebration of the sounds, characters and milestones (as well as the odd calamity) behind the making of an Australian music legend.

Lee Kernaghan is ‘the Boy From the Bush’, an iconic star and 2008 Australian of the Year whose music has shaped a generation of country music fans. For the first time, Lee steps off the stage and invites you behind the scenes, into the ute and over the rutted red dirt on a rollocking journey through his songs and the stories that inspired them.
In a plot with more twists than the Gwydir River, Lee bounces from a disastrous caravan-obliterating encounter on Nine Mile Hill to the triumph of the Starmaker stage, from his infamous teenage rock’n’roll-fuelled Albury High lunchtime music room invasion to the frenzy of the Deniliquin Ute Muster. He shares the doubts that nearly ended his career before it began, the heartache of the bush in crisis and reveals the secrets behind scores of his hit songs. It’s a tapestry of yarns that will fascinate, amuse and entertain diehard fan and newcomer alike.

She’s My Ute, the Outback Club, Hat town, Planet Country – Lee’s hits have earned him 33 Golden Guitars and 3 ARIA Awards, climbed to the top of the Aussie charts 32 times and propelled over 2 million albums off the shelves and into the lives of everyday Australians. Now the songs that celebrate the life and times of our rural heart take on a whole new dimension as Lee draws us into his confidence, into the studio, onto the tour bus and up the hill to his hidden songwriting shack, along the way initiating readers into fully-fledged membership of the Outback Club.

A unique memoir for everyone, Lee Kernaghan’s Boy from the Bush is an affectionate, inspiring and unforgettable montage of characters, conquests and calamities that tumble from the real-life adventures of an Australian legend.